Friday, January 12, 2018

Maine’s Big Bomb Cyclone

Maine’s Big Bomb Cyclone
By: Bailey Baldwin
Edited by: Cassidy Morrell
(National/Global)
     There’s no denying it, this winter in Maine has been one of the coldest in a while, and with the amount of days we missed school, it’s safe to say we’ll be here throughout most of June. On the night of January 3rd, schools in Maine, including Massabesic, called to inform families that there would be a snow day on January 4th, due to an impending snow storm. This snow storm might have just seemed like your typical blizzard, but there was something a bit more special about it.
Source: NOAA’s (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) GOES-16 Satellite
      To further explain, Bombogenesis, or a bomb cyclone, struck the states; Maine through Florida on that day, but it’s not as scary as the name makes itself out to be. A bomb cyclone is when the central pressure of a low pressure system falls 24 millibars in a maximum of 24 hours. Don’t be confused, a millibar is just the unit of measurement used to measure pressure, almost like inches. 
     This was our first big winter storm by many means. First off, the amount of snow we got was crazy, Bangor, Maine got about a foot and a half of snow alone. Also, parts of Old Orchard Beach were completely flooded because of the high tides added with the amount of heavy snow. If you think it’s just another blizzard in New England, you would be wrong. This storm actually stretched all the way down the East Coast, covering places even in Florida with snow!
     But with all things considered, it was very obvious that this storm was no more threatening than the average snow storm. There was nothing different about it except for the distance it stretched and the amount of time it generated. These storms are usually nothing to be afraid of, as long as you prepare for it like you would any other blizzard. The idea of a bomb cyclone is a very interesting thing to look into, so make sure to keep your eye out incase anymore decide to appear this cold winter!

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